The story

George Hilsdon : West Ham United


George Hilsdon was born in Donald Street in Bromley-by-Bow on 10th August 1885. As a boy he went to Marner Street School with Billy Bridgeman. In 1897 the Hilsdon family moved to East Ham and he attended Plashet Lane School. A talented footballer, he was made captain of the school side.

Hilsdon played at centre-half for East Ham Boys in the Corinthian Shield, the inter-district competition introduced by the London Schools' Football Association. The South Essex Mail reported that: "George Hilsdon, Plashet's crack centre-half, is one of the very best lads performing in the Corinthian Competition. He had done splendid work for the East Ham team, which he leads in an admirable manner... He tackles fearlessly, and places accurately to his forwards. George has great fondness for snap shots, and has scored in every Corinthian match."

As Colm Kerrigan, the author of Gatling Gun George Hilsdon (1997) has pointed out: "Nothing is known about George Hilsdon in the three and a half years between leaving school some time during 1900 and his first known appearance in local football around the beginning of 1904." That year he joined Boleyn Castle football team. Soon afterwards he was spotted playing in a Sunday League match by Syd King. The 18 year old signed for West Ham United in November 1904.

Hilsdon scored in his first game for the club on 11th February, 1905. He joined a team that included Charlie Simmons, Herbert Bamlett, William McCartney, Jack Flynn, John Russell, Jack Fletcher, Billy Bridgeman, Christopher Carrick, George Hilsdon, Matt Kingsley, David Gardner, Len Jarvis and Tommy Allison.

Hilsdon also scored a hat-trick in a Western League game against Bristol Rovers. The East End News reported: "The match was quite a triumph for the new West Ham centre-forward, who was responsible for three of the half a dozen goals, and to beat a goalkeeper like Cartlidge thrice in one match is an achievement an older hand than Hilsdon might be proud of. With a little more experience, he will doubtless develop into a really first class player."

On 17th April 1905 Hilsdon was injured in a game against Fulham. He was unable to play for the rest of the season. However, his record of four goals in seven games, was an excellent start to his football career.

Hilsdon was not in the first-team at the beginning of the 1905-06 season. However, after three successive defeats Hilsdon got his chance against Brentford on 30th September 1905. Although he did not score, Hilsdon helped West Ham United win 2-0. He also played in the next game against Norwich City, but a reoccurrence of the previous season's injury meant that he was out of the team for the next six weeks.

Hilsdon returned to the first team in the game against Fulham on 25th November. He kept his place and scored in the next two games against Queen's Park Rangers and Bristol Rovers. However, after only one more game he was replaced by new signing Harry Stapley. He also faced strong competition from Billy Bridgeman and Billy Grassam. Hilsdon was brought back into the first team on 14th April 1906 and again he scored a goal and by the end of the season he had hit the net three times in nine games.

In June 1906, John Tait Robertson, persuaded Syd King to let Hilsdon join Chelsea on a free transfer. Colm Kerrigan, the author of Gatling Gun George Hilsdon (1997) has argued that: "It is difficult to understand why the shrewd Syd King was willing to let him go on a free transfer. Perhaps he had despaired of George ever successfully getting over his injury. Or perhaps, with Stapley doing so well as centre-forward and with competent cover available in the form of Bridgeman and the recently returned Billy Grassam, he may have seen no place for him in his future team plans."

Chelsea were at that time in the Second Division of the Football League. They also had a large following and the game against Manchester United the previous season the club had attracted more than 60,000 spectators to Stamford Bridge, the largest ever for a league match at the time. There were also plans to provide more space that season for a further 20,000 spectators.

Hilsdon played for his new club for the first time against Glossop on 1st September 1906. The Fulham Observer described it as "a sensational debut" as Hilsdon scored five goals in Chelsea's 9-2 victory. Hilsdon was now a marked man and the local newspaper reported that in a game against Fulham Hilsdon "got a terrific charge after about ten minutes, and for the rest of the game wandered about, a shade of his former self. In the dressing room at half-time he was writhing and twisting with pain."

Colm Kerrigan argues in Gatling Gun George Hilsdon that Hilsdon constantly received rough treatment that season. The Fulham Observer reported that in a game against Nottingham Forest Hilsdon "found it difficult to do anything, as directly the ball came in his direction three opponents were on his track".

In 1906 George Hilsdon married Katherine Kelly, the daughter of Irish immigrants living in Whitechapel. The couple went to live in Fulham Palace Road. A son, also named George, was born a year later. Later he had a daughter Kathleen.

Hilsdon got a reputation for fast and hard shooting. The West London Press described a goal he scored against Leicester City in the league: "Hilsdon made a bewildering side movement which just for a second or so nonplussed the two Leicester players around him, but in that brief space Hilsdon had flashed the ball past the astounding Lewis. It was a shot without the slightest element of speculation. It was a Hilsdon goal."

In November 1906 the club programme included a cartoon portrait of Hilsdon entitled "Gatling-Gun George". The accompanying article pointed out that the nickname derived from his shooting "that are simply unstoppable and which travel like shots from a gun."

George Hilsdon scored his 27 goal of the season in Chelsea's 4-1 win over Gainsborough Trinity at Stamford Bridge. This win guaranteed Chelsea promotion to the First Division. S. B. Ashworth, writing in the Daily Mail, predicted that Hilsdon would soon be selected for the England team: "He commands the ball wonderfully, has a fine conception of a centre's duties, and above all, is a deadly shot."

Hilsdon remained in good form the following season. He created another record for the club when he scored six goals in a FA Cup tie against Worksop Town. Hilsdon's 25 league goals that season placed him equal second with Sandy Turnbull of Manchester United and Enoch West of Nottingham Forest. However, Chelsea struggled in the First Division and only just avoided relegation.

Hilsdon won his first international cap for England against Ireland on 15th February 1907. The team that day included Joe Bache, Tim Coleman, Bob Crompton, Sam Hardy and William Wedlock. Hilsdon failed to score in the 1-0 victory and was dropped from the team. Colm Kerrigan argues that "George had a poor game, handicapped by a foot injury. It was rumoured that it was sustained through a deliberate attempt by the Irish to put him out of the game." However, Hilsdon later claimed that he had jarred the muscles of his foot shooting for goal.

Hilsdon started the 1907-08 season in good form by scoring in the home game against Bury. The Fulham Observer reported: "It was fitting that Hilsdon should place the first goal at Stamford Bridge to the credit of Chelsea, and what a magnificent shot it was that found the top corner of the net." The following week he scored a great goal against Sheffield United. The same newspaper reported that Hilsdon treated the crowd "to one of his brilliant dashes through the defence and a consequent goal."

Hilsdon was selected for the trial for the England team in March 1908. The Athletic News was impressed with the way that Hilsdon and Vivian Woodward played together in the South team that drew 4-4 with the North. The newspaper commented that this "superb combination enabled George Hilsdon to shoot all the four goals." He was selected to play against Ireland and scored two goals in England's 3-1 victory. This was followed by a 7-1 hammering of Wales. Once again Hilsdon scored two goals.

On 6th June 1908 Hilsdon scored another two goals in England's 6-1 victory over Austria. This was followed by four goals against Hungary (7-1) and two against Bohemia (4-0). He had now scored 12 goals in 7 internationals. The Fulham Observer reported that Hilsdon was "now England's acknowledged greatest centre-forward and had acquired an accuracy of aim probably unequalled by any great player today."

Hilsdon played against Ireland on 13th April 1909. Despite scoring two goals he was criticised by the Athletic News for being "very deficient in deadliness near the goal". Some journalists claimed that Bert Freeman deserved to replace Hilsdon in the England team. The selectors agreed and he was dropped from the England team against Wales. Hilsdon who had scored an amazing 14 goals in 8 international games, was never to play for his country again.

On 20th November, 1909, Vivian Woodward, Hilsdon's former international colleague, was transferred to Chelsea. That season Hilsdon was not so prolific and Chelsea ended up being relegated from the First Division.

Football journalists began to turn on Hilsdon. The Fulham Observer reported after one game: "Hilsdon did very little at centre-forward with the exception of the one goal he scored. Perhaps he is unable to concentrate on the game." Reg Groves claimed: "He had become too sociable, too careless with his strength and vitality". It was rumoured that Hilsdon had a serious drink problem and he was dropped from the first-team.

After scoring 107 goals in 164 games for Chelsea he was allowed to return to West Ham United in June 1912. The Fulham Observer reported: "Under normal circumstances, they (Chelsea) would probably want nearly four figures before consenting to the international going elsewhere, but strange as it may seem, Chelsea acquired Hilsdon from West Ham without any fee at all, the stipulation being that if he were transferred to another club a proportion of the transfer fee should go to West Ham... During the last two seasons he has declined in form... he will probably be happier at West Ham."

The East Ham Echo reported that during his first home game Hilsdon "had to run the gauntlet of some very uncomplimentary remarks from part of the stand". Hilsdon played at inside-left, with Fred Harrison at centre-forward and Danny Shea at inside-right. The combination played well together. As the East Ham Echo pointed out: "Good as Shea has always been, he is 20 per cent better since the introduction of Hilsdon."

On 15th February 1913 West Ham United played Southampton. The East Ham Echo reported that: "Hilsdon was once more the master-mind of the attack, and it would be difficult to estimate his share in placing the Hammers fifth in the Southern League table this season as against twelfth at the same period last year."

West Ham finished the 1912-13 season in 3rd place in the Southern League. George Hilsdon ended up top scorer with 17 goals in 36 cup and league games. Albert Denyer also did well with 12 in 33 games. However, they clearly missed the goals of Danny Shea in the second half of the season.

Hilsdon scored a goal against Millwall in the opening of the 1913-14 season. Richard Leafe was brought into the team for the next game against Swindon Town and scored both goals in the 3-2 defeat. Leafe went on to score in his next three games.

On 22nd November, 1913, Syd Puddefoot, a local lad, was brought into the team against Gillingham. West Ham won 3-1 and Puddefoot scored one of the goals. As John Northcutt and Roy Shoesmith point out in their book, West Ham United: An Illustrated History (1994): "The 19-year-old Syd Puddefoot arrived and he found the net on 13 occasions in his first 11 games." Puddefoot's form resulted in Hilsdon being dropped from the team.

Dan Bailey, was also in good form and Hilsdon found himself out of the first-team. Injuries to Richard Leafe and Syd Puddefoot brought him back into the team and he scored two goals against Millwall on 14th April 1914. The East Ham Echo reported that Hilsdon scored "with one of those terrific shots for which he is famed, but which we have seen all too few of late."

West Ham United finished in 6th place in the 1913-14 season. Richard Leafe was top scorer with 21 goals. Syd Puddefoot was second in the list with 16 in 20 cup and league games. Hilsdon only scored 6 goals in 17 games.

Despite the outbreak of the First World War the Football League decided to allow the 1914-15 season to continue. West Ham had high hopes that they could win the Southern League for the first time. In Syd Puddefoot they had the country's most promising young goalscorer.

West Ham won six of their first 12 games. Syd Puddefoot got nine goals in these 12 games. George Hilsdon and Richard Leafe were also in good form and got 7 between them. Once again West Ham were challenging for the Southern League title.

In October 1914, the Secretary of State, Lord Kitchener, issued a call for volunteers to both replace those killed in the early battles of the war. On 12th December William Joynson Hicks established the 17th Service (Football) Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment. This became known as the Football Battalion. Several top footballers joined this battalion. This included Frank Buckley, Walter Tull, Vivian Woodward and Evelyn Lintott. Buckley, a former soldier, became commander of the battalion.

The Football Association called for all professional footballers who were not married, to join the armed forces. Some newspapers suggested that those who did not join up were "contributing to a German victory." The Athletic News responded angrily: "The whole agitation is nothing less than an attempt by the ruling classes to stop the recreation on one day in the week of the masses ... What do they care for the poor man's sport? The poor are giving their lives for this country in thousands. In many cases they have nothing else... These should, according to a small clique of virulent snobs, be deprived of the one distraction that they have had for over thirty years."

Frederick Charrington, the son of the wealthy brewer who had established the Tower Hamlets Mission, attacked the West Ham players for being effeminate and cowardly for getting paid for playing football while others were fighting on the Western Front.

West Ham players responded to this call to join the armed forces. Jack Tresadern joined the Royal Garrison Artillery. Three members of the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee visited Upton Park and made an appeal for volunteers during half-time. Joe Webster, the West Ham United goalkeeper, was one of those who joined the Football Battalion as a result of this appeal. Hilsdon continued playing in the team and scored 5 in 20 games in the 1914-15 season.

Attendances at league games fell dramatically during the second-half of the season because of the impact of the First World War. It was decided that the Southern League would not operate in the 1915-16 season. As football players only had contracts to play for one season at a time, they were now out of work. It has been estimated that around 2,000 of Britain's 5,000 professional footballers now joined the armed forces. This included George Hilsdon who joined the East Surrey Regiment. He served on the Western Front, had to endure a mustard gas attack at Arras in 1917. This badly damaged his lungs and although he played briefly for Chatham Town after the war. He scored 14 goals in six games in 1919 but he was eventually forced to retire from the game.

In 1924 Hilsdon joined Fred Karno's Troup, a popular vaudeville act. One method of publicizing the company as it travelled round the country was to arrange a charity football match between the cast of the show and some local organization.

According to Colm Kerrigan, the author of Gatling Gun George Hilsdon (1997) argued: "Years of success had not dampened his East End spirit of survival, and he scraped a living in various ways, all of them, insofar as is known, on the right side of the law - but sometimes only just. One of his escapades, during a bleak period, was to go around several East End pubs, raffling boxes of chocolates, but arranging for the prize to be won on every occasion by his wife."

George Hilsdon died in Leicester on 10th September, 1941. Only four people attended his funeral (son, daughter, son-in-law and grandson). The funeral was paid for by the Football Association.


จอร์จ ฮิลส์ดัน

He was signed as an inside-forward from West Ham United in 1906 but manager John Tait Robertson was certain that Hilsdon had the potential to play as a centre-forward. He was right.

George made a spectacular start to his Chelsea career, scoring five times on his debut, a 9-2 win over Glossop North End. It was a performance that earned him the nickname 'Gatling Gun.' In his first season he scored 27 goals and helped the club to our first ever promotion.

George was almost as prolific the next season, netting 26 league goals and adding six in one game, an FA Cup win over Worksop Town. Six goals in a game by one player remains a club record. After three years he had scored 86 goals in 106 appearances. By now he was an England international and scored 14 times in his eight internationals including eight on England's first ever overseas tour.

After that though, George's Chelsea career was blighted by injuries and alcoholism although his final total of 108 goals ranks him ninth in the club's all-time list. Three years later in 1912 he was allowed to rejoin West Ham United where his career was ended by the outbreak of World War One.

Hilsdon is immortalised at Stamford Bridge by the weather vane which is a feature at the ground.

ข่าวอื่นๆ

โพลล์ – ใครคือนักเตะทรงคุณค่าของเชลซี ฤดูกาล 20/21?

เพื่อเป็นการปิดฉากการย้อนกลับไปมองฤดูกาล 2020/21 เราได้คัดเลือกนักเตะยอดเยี่ยมของเชลซีและให้คุณบอกเราว่า ผู้เล่นคนใดมีส่วนร่วมกับความสำเร็จของพวกเรามากที่สุด

แฟนบอลไทยโหวตชัยชนะเหนือ "ราชันชุดขาว" เกมยอดเยี่ยมอันดับ 2 ของฤดูกาล

ชัยชนะเหนือเรอัล มาดริดในการแข่งขันแชมเปี้ยนส์ ลีก รอบรองชนะเลิศ ได้รับการโหวตจากแฟนบอลชาวไทยให้เป็นเกมยอดเยี่ยมอันดับ 2 ของฤดูกาล 2020/21

ส่องมุมสื่อ: เชลซีเล็ง สปินาซโซล่า เติมแบ็คซ้าย, เมาท์ ได้รับคำชื่นชมจากขวัญใจของเขา

รวมข่าวเชลซีจากสื่อนอกในวันนี้ สิงห์บลูส์เล็งดึงตัว เลโอนาร์โด้ สปินาซโซล่า จากอาแอส โรม่า ขณะที่ อันเดรส ดาเลสซานโดร ได้กล่าวชื่นชม เมสัน เมาท์


George Hilsdon

George Richard „Gatling Gun” Hilsdon (ur. 10 sierpnia 1885 w Wielkim Londynie, zm. 10 września 1941 w Leicester) – angielski piłkarz grający niegdyś na pozycji napastnika. Nosił przydomek Gatling Gun z powodu zdolności do częstego zdobywania bramek. Jego brat, Jack Hilsdon, w ówczesnych czasach również był piłkarzem i występował w West Ham United.

Hilsdon do Chelsea trafił w 1906 roku z West Ham United w którego barwach rozegrał w lidze 16 meczów i strzelił siedem goli. W swoim debiucie w drużynie The Blues zdobył pięć bramek w wygranym 9:2 spotkaniu z Glossop North End. 11 stycznia 1908 roku sześciokrotnie trafiał do siatki Worksop Town F.C. w spotkaniu Pucharu Anglii. Ten wynik jest niepobitym do dziś rekordem Chelsea, jeśli chodzi o gole strzelone w jednym meczu. W jednym z programów meczowych został opisany jako „żywy dowód na to, że nie trzeba się urodzić na północ od rzeki Tweed aby stać się wspaniałym piłkarzem”.

W swoim pierwszym sezonie spędzonym na Stamford Bridge Hilsdon strzelił 27 goli czym w znacznym stopniu przyczynił się do pierwszego w historii awansu Chelsea do First Division. W przeciągu następnych trzech lat zaliczył 75 trafień w 99 spotkaniach. Jego późniejsza kariera w The Blues była hamowana przez częste kontuzje oraz życiowe problemy (walka z alkoholizmem), jednakże w sezonie 1910/11 zdołał strzelić 19 goli. Hilsdon został pierwszym graczem The Pensioners który zdobył ponad 100 bramek, zaś występy w Chelsea zakończył ze 107 trafieniami w 164 grach i na liście najskuteczniejszych zawodników The Blues zajmuje obecnie dziewiąte miejsce.

Dobre występy w klubie spowodowały, że Hilsdon był powoływany do reprezentacji swojego kraju, w której często grał ze swoim klubowym kolegą, Jimmym Windridgem. W kadrze zadebiutował 16 lutego 1907 w spotkaniu z Irlandią. Łącznie strzelił 14 goli, w tym cztery w meczu z Węgrami latem 1908 roku. Ostatni występ w barwach narodowych zaliczył w lutym 1909 roku, kiedy to zagrał w pojedynku z Irlandią. Zdobył wówczas dwie bramki które dały Anglikom zwycięstwo 4:0.

W 1912 roku Hilsdon powrócił do swojego macierzystego klubu, West Hamu i w sezonie 1912/13 został jego najlepszym strzelcem w wynikiem 17 goli w 36 grach. W Młotach występował przez trzy lata, po czym w 1915 roku zakończył swoją karierę.

Gdy wybuchła wojna Hilsdon nie zamierzał iść do wojska. Jego pasją niezmiennie pozostawała piłka, w którą wciąż grywał we wschodnim Londynie. Policja zaprowadziła go jednak siłą do ośrodka poboru i wówczas został wcielony do armii. Po wojnie definitywnie zakończył swoją karierę i zajął się prowadzeniem pubu. Zmarł w Leicester w 1941 roku, a na jego pogrzeb przybyły zaledwie cztery osoby. Nie doczekał się swojego nagrobka, żaden kamień nie zdobi jego grobu. Tylko powietrzny wiatraczek uformowany w sylwetkę piłkarza i umieszczony na wschodniej trybunie Stamford Bridge przypomina, że niegdyś występował tam taki zawodnik.


1904-05 Southern League : First Division

Reginald Arthur Wade signed professional for Hammers in 1929, after gaining an F.A. Amateur Cup winners medal with Ilford F.C. in that year's Final against Leyton at Highbury. Taking the step up the professionalism in his stride, he made his First Division debut in the left-back position in a 4-1 victory over Liverpool at Upton Park on the 18 January 1930. His best run in the First Team was in 1930-31 season when he made 28 appearances. He transferred to Aldershot in 1932. Also had a spell with Millwall whom he joined from Barking in 1925, but failed to make the first team.

GEORGE HILSDON makes his Hammers debut against NEW BROMPTON at Upton Park

JOHN DOWSEY (1926-27) Born this day Willington, Co. Durham

Winger cum-inside-forward secured from Newcastle United after scoring 54 goals for the Magpies' second-string during two seasons in the North Eastern League. Found success hard to come by at Upton Park, making only the one First Division appearance against Sheffield Wednesday at Hillsborough in a 0-1 reverse on the 6 September 1926. John joined Carlisle United when he left West Ham in August 1927. He moved on to Sunderland in 1928, Notts County in 1929 and was with Northampton Town between 1931 and 1934.

SIDNEY SMITH makes his Hammers debut against PORTSMOUTH at Upton Park

WILLIAM WILDMAN signs from EVERTON on weekly salary of £4.00

FRED BLACKBURN signs from BLACKBURN ROVERS

HARRY HINDLE signs from NELSON

LIONEL WATSON sign from BLACKBURN ROVERS

FREDERICK GAMBLE (1931) Born this day Charing Cross, London

Frederick Charles Gamble started his career with Southall, Frederick Gamble signed professional forms for Brentford before joining West Ham in 1931. Frederick was a magnificently-built centre-forward whose six-foot frame was capable of unsettling the strongest of defences. At Upton Park, however, Fred had the stiffest possible competition for the First Team place in Vivian Gibbins and Victor Watson, and although he scored in both his First Division appearances at Leicester City a 1-1 draw 4 April 1931 and Bolton Wanderers respectively, he was never given the opportunity to show the Boleyn fans his undoubted talent at the highest level, he was later allowed to rejoin his former team-mates at Griffin Park.

DAVID BAILLIE (1925-1929) Born this day Ilford, Essex

Born a long goal-kick in nearby Ilford on this day in 1905, the same season West Ham United moved to the Boleyn Ground. The net-minder began his career with non-league Croyton FC before signing for West Ham in 1925 as understudy to the great Ted Hufton. Unfortunately due to lost records during the Second World War it is unknown what competitive Reserve Combination game Baillie made his debut against in that first 1925-26 season. What is known is he made his initial debut playing in goal for the ‘Possibles’ in the opening seasons Practice match against the more senior professions at the club the ‘Probables’. The professionals winning 5-0 at Upton Park on 15 August 1925. He remained with West Ham for six seasons but made only 17 first team appearances in all competitions - 16 in Division One and one in the FA. Baillie made his senior Hammers debut in a 3-2 home Division One defeat by Huddersfield Town on 28 November 1925. Undoubtedly his best moment in a West Ham shirt occurred on 7 March 1927, when he was part of the team that thrashed Arsenal 7-0 at the Boleyn Ground. Amazingly, he then conceded seven in a 7-0 Division One defeat at Everton on 27 October of the same year. With goals flying in all over the place during the 1920s, Baillie was involved in some high-scoring matches during his time at West Ham, including a 4-5 home defeat by Middlesbrough on 26 November 1927 and 4-3 home win over Blackburn Rovers on 31 March 1928. Baillie moved to Chester in 1929 before returning to the Boleyn Ground to take up the role of assistant groundsman.


George Hilsdon : West Ham United - History

Although the 1913 F A cup had its fair share of upsets it still produced a never before seen cup final between the two teams who had fought out the League Championship. League runners up Aston Villa took revenge for losing the title race to Sunderland in a bad tempered encounter in which a penalty was missed for the first time in a final. A top two cup final would not be repeated for another seventy-three years.

Bristol Rovers 2-0 Notts County

First round: 11th January 1913

Scorers: Harold Roe <30>, Bert Morley

Bristol Rovers: 1:, 2:, 3:, 4:, 5:, 6:,ه: Billy Peplow,و: James Shervey, 9: Harold Roe, 10:Phillips,11:Bill Palmer

Notts County: 1:Albert Iremonger, 2:Bert Morley, 3:Alf West, 4:Billy Flint, 5:Arthur Clamp, 6:Dick Allsebrook, 7:Bill Hooper, 8:Albert Waterall, 9:Dai Williams, 10:Freddie Jones, 11:Horace Henshall

Southern League strugglers Bristol Rovers had thirce faced top flight opposition during the previous decade and lost narrowly on each occasion. This time they faced a Notts County side whose away form in the league would ultimately ensure their relegation while the cup had seen them humbled in consecutive seasons by Southern League Swindon. Rovers were no Swindon but, on a day when eight of the first round ties fell to the weather, and six others had to be abandoned, they were more than a match for the visitors. Harold Roe neatly headed home a corner to send them on their way but in teaming rain, Eastville remained a tense place until another corner was met by James Shervey whose shot looked to be going wide until the unfortunate Bert Morley helped it into the net. Rover's cup run continued in the second round with the defeat of fellow non leaguers Norwich but in round three they were outclassed by Everton, going down 0-4.

Huddersfield Town 3-1 Sheffield United

First round: 15th January 1913

  Second division Huddersfield had never been beyond the first round before and that record looked like remaining as they entered the final ten minutes of their first round tie trailing United 1-2. Then mother nature stepped in and the blizzard conditions, which had prevailed throughout the country became bad enough to force the referee to abandon the tie. Four days later Huddersfield, led by the ex Scotland and Newcastle star Jimmy Howie impressively swept aside United. Armour's cross gave Mann the chance to open the scoring before Jee unluckily missed the chance to double the lead before the interval when he struck the crossbar. Tom Elliott gave them the perfect start to the second priod when he fought his way through straight from the kick off the make it two-nil. Sandy Mutch gave the first division side a lifeline when he dropped the ball at Gillespie's feet but United's revival was killed off when Elliott got his second of the game. Town were upset themselves by Southern League Swindon in the second round but the seeds were being sown for a side who would dominate the early twenties with Sandy Mutch and Frank Mann < pictured >gaining cup winners medals in 1922.

Huddersfield Town: 1:Sandy Mutch, 2:Charles Dinnie, 3:Fred Bullock, 4:Simon Beaton, 5:Fred 'Tiny' Fayers, 6:James Dow, 7:Andrew Armour, 8:Tom Elliott, 9:Jimmy Howie, 10:Frank Mann, 11:Joe Jee

Sheffield United: 1:Joe Mitchell, 2:Bill Cook, 3:Bob Benson, 4:Bill Brelsford, 5:Bernard Wilkinson, 6:Albert Trueman, 7:Jim Simmons, 8:Joe Kitchen, 9:Billy Gillespie, 10:Wally Hardinge, 11:Bobby Evans

West Bromwich Albion 0-3 West Ham United

First round, second replay: 22nd January 1913

Scorers: Gorge Hilsdon <8, 44>, Bertie Denyer (49>

West Ham had gone from being a little known east London side two years earlier to one of the capital's most celebrated sides, thanks in no small part to their having claimed four First division scalps in the last two cup competitions. This tie with last season's cup finalists, Albion had fallen victim to the arctic weather on the Saturday but did get replayed two days later, ending in a draw. Hopes were high with home advantage in the replay but Albion forced a 2-2 draw with the FA opting, a little surprisingly to stage the second replay at Chelsea's Stamford Bridge, rather than opting for a neutral city venue. The Southern League side got off to a great start through George Hilsdon and two well timed goals either side of half time sealed Albion's fate. The Hammers thus earned a trip to title chasing Aston Villa in the second round where they went down 0-5, the Villains going on to win the cup. George Hilsdon had started out at Upton Park before being virtually given to Chelsea nine years earlier. The man who became known as "Gattling gun" Hilsdon scored the goal which propelled the Stamford Bridge outfit into the top flight and earned him international honours with England. Hilson began to lose form though and there were rumours that he was battling with alcoholism by the time Chelsea sold him back to West Ham to replace their previous hero Danny Shea who had moved on to Blackburn. Like so many of his colleagues, the war virtually ended Hilsdon's career as he suffered lung damage when gassed at Arras in 1917. His existance was a meagre one after that, at one time being part of the famous Fred Karno troupe while he also ran a pub lottery scam in which the prize, sually a box of chocolates was always won by his wife. Hilsdon died in 1941, almost forgotten by all who saw him in his playing days with just four relatives attending his funeral in an unmarked grave.

West Bromwich Albion: 1:Len Morwood, 2:Joe Smith, 3:Arthur Cook, 4:Frank Waterhouse, 5:Fred Buck, 6:Bobby McNeal, 7:Claude Jephcott, 8:Howard Gregory, 9:Fred Morris, 10:Sid Bowser, 11:Ben Shearman  

West Ham United: 1:Joseph Hughes, 2:James Rothwell, 3:Harry Forster, 4:Dan Woodards, 5:Fred Harrison, 6:Tom Randall, 7:Herbert Ashton, 8:George Butcher, 9:Bertie Denyer, 10:George Hilsdon, 11:Jack Casey

Reading 1-0 Tottenham Hostpur

Reading fans had been waiting twelve years for revenge over Tottenham in the cup as their faithful hadn't forgotten Tottenham defender, Sandy Tait punching the ball off the line during their 1-1 draw in the 1901 competition. The referee missed it, Reading didn't get the late penalty that would surely have taken them into the semi finals, and Tottenham won the replay. To make matters worse Spurs then also destroyed a hapless West Bromwich Albion side in the semi final and went on to win the cup. Reading fans remained convinced that if justice had been served in the quarter final then their heroes would have achieved the same results against Albion and Sheffield United. Tottenham fans however could rightly point to the trophy itself which has thier name inscribed upon it in 1901 and say that the rest is all just ifs buts and maybes. They couldn't begrudge Reading's tiny moment of revenge however with this cup upset as Reggie Pinfield settled a largely uneventful tie at Elm Park in which the first leaguers dominated for seventy minutes without ever troubling the Reading defence. Strangely Reading's best spell of the game came only after they had been effectively reduced to ten men with Jack Smith manfully playing on despite having broken a rib. Reading got the perfect draw in round three as they welcommed League Champions Blackburn to Elm Park and for a time another shock was on when Joe Bailey put them in front but Rovers quickly levelled and ground Reading down to win the tie in the second half.

Reading: 1:Rab Bernard, 2:Jack Smith, 3:Charlie Stevens, 4:, 5:, 6:Ted Hanney, 7:J Morris, 8:Joe Bailey, 9:Reggie Pinfield, 10:Max Seeburg, 11:A Burton

Tottenham Hotspur: 1:Tommy Lunn, 2:Charlie Brittan, 3:Fred Webster, 4:Findlay Weir, 5:Charlie Rance, 6:Arthur Grimsdell, 7:Wally Tattersall, 8:Billy Minter, 9:Jimmy Cantrell, 10:Bobby Steel, 11:Bert Middlemiss

Third round: 22nd February 1913

Scorers: : Jimmy Smith <20>, David Howie <51>, : Sam Kirkman

The only club in the history of the Football League to have the name of their ground in brackets in their name. Officially though the club were always referred to as simply Bradford by the press while the club known by that moniker today were always referred to as Bradford City, much like the Dundee clubs today. Bradford lived in the shadow of their neighbours across the city, a task made more difficult by the fact that soccer in general lived in the shadows in a rugby league hotbed. Bradford's progress to their first ever appearance in the third round had all been on home soil, knocking out Lancashire Combination side Barrow in a replay, having bought home advantage after being held in the first game before second division Wolves were easily sent packing in round two. The visit of Sheffield Wednesday would be only the second time a top flight club had visited Park Avenue, the previous being neighours City who had left victorious by the only goal in the previous year's competition. Wednesday were flying in the top flight though, tied with three other teams at the top of the table and really fancying their chances of the league and cup double. Bradford dominated the first half and deservedly took the lead when Spoors was caught flat footed by Smith, who fired home. And it should have been two before soone after but for the referee not being sharp enough to notice that Teddy Davison carried the ball over the line when stoppng Tommy Little's shot. Bradford looked like they would be made to pay for that when Sam Kirkman levelled but the home side weren't to be outdone and in a blistering second half netted the winning goal through David Howie. Few Bradford fans were too upset when Aston Villa easily despatched them in the next round.

Bradford: 1: Bob Mason, 2: Sandy Watson, 3: Sam Blackham, 4: George Halley,م: Herbert Dainty,ن: Jack Scott,ه: Willie Kivlichan, 8: Dan Munro, 9: Tommy Little, 10: David Howie, 11:Jimmy Smith

Sheffield: 1: Teddy Davison, 2: Ted Worrall, 3: Jimmy Spoors, 4: Tom Brittleton, 5: Bob McSkimming, 6: Jimmy Campbell,ه: Sam Kirkman,و: Teddy Glennon, 9: David McLean, 10: Andy Wilson, 11: George Robertson

Burnley 3-1 Middlesbrough

Third round: 22nd February 1913

Scorers:  Teddy Hodgson <30>, Bert Freeman <59>, <80>: Edmund Eyre

Promotion chasing Burnley's contest with Middlesbrough had the football specials rolling into the town all morning and when the Clarets fell behind midway through the first half the travelling Boro fans thought that it was job done. Bert Freeman was the difference as the ex Everton man set up the equaliser for Teddy Hodgson before scoring twice in a heated and frantic second half to set up a dream trip to local rivals and defending League champions Blackburn in the quarter finals.

Burnley: 1:Jerry Dawson, 2:Tom Bamford, 3:David Taylor, 4:Willie McLaren, 5:Tommy Boyle, 6:Billy Watson, 7. 8:Dick Lindley, 9:Bert Freeman, 10:Teddy Hodgson, 11:William Husband

Middlesbrough: 1:Tim Williamson, 2. 3:Jimmy Weir, 4:Joe Crozier, 5:Andrew Jackson, 6:Malcolm George, 7:Jock Stirling, 8:Jackie Carr, 9:George Elliott, 10: Jimmy Windridge 11:Edmund Eyre

Blackburn Rovers 0-1 Burnley

Quarter final: 8th March 1913

At Ewood Park, a fortnight after the victory over Middlesbrugh, Burnley pulled off a huge result against their local rivals, and League Champions Blackburn. Unsurprisingly Rovers had by far the better of things but the crucial goal came from Tommy Boyle on the half hour before Jerry Dawson took on a man of the match role. The Burnley keeper repeatedly foiled the Rovers front line with the best chance coming right at the death when Jock Simpson had a great chance only to get his feet tangled. To the delight of the travelling Burnley contingent, who outnumbered the home fans and cheered wildly as the shot went out for a throw.Burnley held the champions elect Sunderland to a replay in the semi final before losing a cracker of a replay 2-3. Promotion was achieved at the end of the season and Burnley returned to Ewood Park for a league encounter on New Year's day 1914 where they left with a point, while Middlesbrough took revenge for their cup exit at Turf Moor in April. Not that the Burnley fans cared that much as Bertie Freeman scored the winner against Liverpool later that month in the cup final with Bamford, Taylor, Boyle and Lindley also picking up winner's medals.

Burnley: 1:Jerry Dawson, 2:Tom Bamford, 3:David Taylor, 4. 5:Tommy Boyle, 6:Willie McLaren, 7:Billy Watson, 8:Dick Lindley, 9:Bert Freeman, 10:Teddy Hodgson, 11:William Husband

Blackburn: 1:Alfred Robinson, 2:Bob Crompton, 3:Arthur Cowell, 4:Albert Walmsley, 5:Percy Smith, 6:Billy Bradshaw, 7:Jock Simpson, 8:Eddie Latheron, 9:Danny Shea, 10:Wattie Aitkenhead, 11:Walter Anthony


Who is Chelsea's all-time top scorer?

Chelsea certainly boast an illustrious list when it comes to the subject of all-time top scorers.

Many iconic names have featured for the Blues across the years.

But only a select few have smashed a century of goals for the club.

Here are the top ten marksmen in Chelsea’s history.

Frank Lampard (211)

Frank Lampard’s legacy will echo around Stamford Bridge until football ceases to exist (which nearly happened thanks to the Super League).

211 goals in 648 appearances cements him as Chelsea’s record goal scorer, surpassing Bobby Tambling’s tally in 2013.

(Photo by Ben Radford/Getty Images)

Bobby Tambling (202)

Up until Lampard smashed home against Aston Villa, Tambling was the Blues highest goal getter for over 40 years.

He netted on his debut in 1959 and didn’t stop until he left to join Crystal Palace in 1970.

Kerry Dixon (193)

Coming in a close third is the legendary Kerry Dixon.

In his first season with Chelsea, he scored 34 goals and was swiftly up to 70 in 101 games with another fine haul the following year.

(Photo by Trevor Jones/Allsport/Getty Images)

Didier Drogba (164)

A man who needs no introduction to the Blues faithful.

Didier Drogba arrived in 2004 from Marseille as a highly rated striker. He left South West London as one of the Premier League’s greatest ever forwards. Plus he scored that header in Munich…

Roy Bentley (150)

Very few players can manage one campaign as the club’s top scorer. Roy Bentley did it consecutively seven times after joining Chelsea in 1948.

Bentley sadly passed away in 2018, but memories of his footballing excellency will live on forever.

UNITED KINGDOM – JANUARY 01: Roy Bentley, Chelsea’s captain of the 1955 title-winning side (Photo by Darren Walsh/Chelsea FC Via Getty Images)

Peter Osgood (150)

Tied with Bentley in fifth place is the oh so good Peter Osgood.

Another Chelsea great who tragically left us in 2006, a statue outside the Bridge was erected of Osgood for his iconic services to the team.

Jimmy Greaves (132)

Here’s a stat for you. Jimmy Greaves scored 114 goals for the Blues youth side before becoming a senior pro.

Unfortunately, that didn’t count towards his final sum, which rests at 132.

circa 1960: British footballer Jimmy Greaves of Chelsea. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

George Mills (125)

A special place in the heart of Chelsea fans will always be reserved for George Mills.

He was the first man to score a century of league goals for the club and was the last player for the Blues to score a hattrick against Liverpool.

Eden Hazard (110)

There wasn’t a dry eye in the house when Eden Hazard moved to Real Madrid in 2019.

The Brilliant Belgian bagged 110 goals across a sensational seven-year period. You’re always welcome back at the Bridge, Eden.

(Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)

George Hildson (108)

George Hilsdon’s name is one for the history books.

He was the first centurion goal scorer for Chelsea, netting 27 goals in his maiden season to help the Blues to their inaugural league promotion.

Nathaniel is a football journalist who graduated from the University of Derby. He has worked at Burton Albion as part of their media team for two years. Nathaniel produces regular articles for the club’s official website and match-day programme. He covered the 2018 U20 Women’s World Cup in Brittany and has reported from grounds ranging from non-league up to the Premier League.


Thursday, 14 August 2008

The Strange Case of George Hilsdon

On another thread I have written about how West Ham have always sold their best young players in order to make a profit for the club owners. However, in June 1906, Syd King, gave away one of West Ham's best ever prospects, George Hilsdon, to Chelsea. It is difficult to explain this action unless King received a backhander.

Hilsdon, who was 18 years old at the time, signed for West Ham United in November 1904. Hilsdon scored in his first game for the club on 11th February, 1905. Hilsdon also scored a hat-trick in a Western League game against Bristol Rovers. The East End News reported: "The match was quite a triumph for the new West Ham centre-forward, who was responsible for three of the half a dozen goals, and to beat a goalkeeper like Cartlidge thrice in one match is an achievement an older hand than Hilsdon might be proud of. With a little more experience, he will doubtless develop into a really first class player."

On 17th April 1905 Hilsdon was injured in a game against Fulham. He was unable to play for the rest of the season. However, his record of four goals in seven games, was an excellent start to his football career. In June 1906, John Tait Robertson, persuaded Syd King to let Hilsdon join Chelsea on a free transfer. Colm Kerrigan, the author of Gatling Gun George Hilsdon (1997) has argued that: "It is difficult to understand why the shrewd Syd King was willing to let him go on a free transfer." Indeed. At the same time, King gave away another extremely promising player, Billy Bridgeman, to Chelsea. As it happens, both Hilsdon and Bridgeman played football for Marner Street School. Bridgeman went on to play 160 games for Chelsea.

Hilsdon played for his new club for the first time against Glossop on 1st September 1906. The Fulham Observer described it as "a sensational debut" as Hilsdon scored five goals in Chelsea's 9-2 victory. Hilsdon was now a marked man and the local newspaper reported that in a game against Fulham Hilsdon "got a terrific charge after about ten minutes, and for the rest of the game wandered about, a shade of his former self. In the dressing room at half-time he was writhing and twisting with pain."

Colm Kerrigan argues in Gatling Gun George Hilsdon that Hilsdon constantly received rough treatment that season. The Fulham Observer reported that in a game against Nottingham Forest, Hilsdon "found it difficult to do anything, as directly the ball came in his direction three opponents were on his track".

Hilsdon got a reputation for fast and hard shooting. The West London Press described a goal he scored against Leicester City in the league: "Hilsdon made a bewildering side movement which just for a second or so nonplussed the two Leicester players around him, but in that brief space Hilsdon had flashed the ball past the astounding Lewis. It was a shot without the slightest element of speculation. It was a Hilsdon goal."

In November 1906 the club programme included a cartoon portrait of Hilsdon entitled "Gatling-Gun George". The accompanying article pointed out that the nickname derived from his shooting "that are simply unstoppable and which travel like shots from a gun."

George Hilsdon scored his 27 goal of the season in Chelsea's 4-1 win over Gainsborough Trinity at Stamford Bridge. This win guaranteed Chelsea promotion to the First Division. S. B. Ashworth, writing in the Daily Mail, predicted that Hilsdon would soon be selected for the England team: "He commands the ball wonderfully, has a fine conception of a centre's duties, and above all, is a deadly shot."

Hilsdon remained in good form the following season. He created another record for the club when he scored six goals in a FA Cup tie against Worksop Town. Hilsdon's 25 league goals that season placed him equal second with Sandy Turnbull of Manchester United and Enoch West of Nottingham Forest.

Hilsdon won his first international cap for England against Ireland on 15th February 1907. Hilsdon failed to score in the 1-0 victory and was dropped from the team. Colm Kerrigan argues that "George had a poor game, handicapped by a foot injury. It was rumoured that it was sustained through a deliberate attempt by the Irish to put him out of the game." However, Hilsdon later claimed that he had jarred the muscles of his foot shooting for goal.

Hilsdon was selected for the trial for the England team in March 1908. The Athletic News was impressed with the way that Hilsdon and Vivian Woodward played together in the South team that drew 4-4 with the North. The newspaper commented that this "superb combination enabled George Hilsdon to shoot all the four goals." He was selected to play against Ireland and scored two goals in England's 3-1 victory. This was followed by a 7-1 hammering of Wales. Once again Hilsdon scored two goals.

On 6th June 1908 Hilsdon scored another two goals in England's 6-1 victory over Austria. This was followed by four goals against Hungary (7-1) and two against Bohemia (4-0). He had now scored 12 goals in 7 internationals. The Fulham Observer reported that Hilsdon was "now England's acknowledged greatest centre-forward and had acquired an accuracy of aim probably unequalled by any great player today."

Hilsdon played against Ireland on 13th April 1909. Despite scoring two goals he was criticised by the Athletic News for being "very deficient in deadliness near the goal". Hilsdon who had scored an amazing 14 goals in 8 international games, was never to play for his country again.

Football journalists began to turn on Hilsdon. The Fulham Observer reported after one game: "Hilsdon did very little at centre-forward with the exception of the one goal he scored. Perhaps he is unable to concentrate on the game." Reg Groves claimed: "He had become too sociable, too careless with his strength and vitality". It was rumoured that Hilsdon had a serious drink problem and he was dropped from the first-team.

After scoring 107 goals in 164 games for Chelsea he was allowed to return to West Ham United in June 1912. The Fulham Observer reported: "Under normal circumstances, they (Chelsea) would probably want nearly four figures before consenting to the international going elsewhere, but strange as it may seem, Chelsea acquired Hilsdon from West Ham without any fee at all, the stipulation being that if he were transferred to another club a proportion of the transfer fee should go to West Ham. During the last two seasons he has declined in form. he will probably be happier at West Ham."

The East Ham Echo reported that during his first home game Hilsdon "had to run the gauntlet of some very uncomplimentary remarks from part of the stand". Hilsdon played at inside-left, with Fred Harrison at centre-forward and Danny Shea at inside-right. The combination played well together. As the East Ham Echo pointed out: "Good as Shea has always been, he is 20 per cent better since the introduction of Hilsdon."

On 15th February 1913 West Ham United played Southampton. The East Ham Echo reported that: "Hilsdon was once more the master-mind of the attack, and it would be difficult to estimate his share in placing the Hammers fifth in the Southern League table this season as against twelfth at the same period last year."

West Ham finished the 1912-13 season in 3rd place in the Southern League. George Hilsdon ended up top scorer with 17 goals in 36 cup and league games. However, the following season he began hitting the bottle and he lost his form and his place in the team.

In October 1914, the Secretary of State, Lord Kitchener, issued a call for volunteers to both replace those killed in the early battles of the war. On 12th December William Joynson Hicks established the 17th Service (Football) Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment. This became known as the Football Battalion.

The Football Association called for all professional footballers who were not married, to join the armed forces. Some newspapers suggested that those who did not join up were "contributing to a German victory." The Athletic News responded angrily: "The whole agitation is nothing less than an attempt by the ruling classes to stop the recreation on one day in the week of the masses . What do they care for the poor man's sport? The poor are giving their lives for this country in thousands. In many cases they have nothing else. These should, according to a small clique of virulent snobs, be deprived of the one distraction that they have had for over thirty years."

Frederick Charrington, the son of the wealthy brewer who had established the Tower Hamlets Mission, attacked the West Ham players for being effeminate and cowardly for getting paid for playing football while others were fighting on the Western Front.

It was decided that the Football League would not operate in the 1915-16 season. As football players only had contracts to play for one season at a time, they were now out of work. It has been estimated that around 2,000 of Britain's 5,000 professional footballers now joined the armed forces. This included George Hilsdon who joined the East Surrey Regiment. He served on the Western Front, had to endure a mustard gas attack at Arras in 1917. This badly damaged his lungs and although he played briefly for Chatham Town after the war. He scored 14 goals in six games in 1919 but he was eventually forced to retire from the game.

In 1924 Hilsdon joined Fred Karno's Troup, a popular vaudeville act. One method of publicizing the company as it travelled round the country was to arrange a charity football match between the cast of the show and some local organization.

According to Colm Kerrigan, the author of Gatling Gun George Hilsdon (1997) argued: "Years of success had not dampened his East End spirit of survival, and he scraped a living in various ways, all of them, insofar as is known, on the right side of the law - but sometimes only just. One of his escapades, during a bleak period, was to go around several East End pubs, raffling boxes of chocolates, but arranging for the prize to be won on every occasion by his wife."

George Hilsdon died in Leicester on 10th September, 1941. Only four people attended his funeral (son, daughter, son-in-law and grandson). The funeral was paid for by the Football Association.


The Academy of Football

The club promotes the popular idea of West Ham being "The Academy of Football", with the moniker adorning the ground's new stadium façade. The comment predominantly refers to the club's youth development system which was established by manager Ted Fenton during the 1950s, that has seen a number of international players emerge through the ranks. [ 69 ] Most notably the club contributed three players to the World Cup winning England side of 1966 including club icon Bobby Moore, as well as Martin Peters and Geoff Hurst who between them scored all of England's goals in the eventual 4–2 victory. Other academy players that have gone on to play for England have included Trevor Brooking, Alvin Martin, Tony Cottee and Paul Ince.

Since the late 1990s Rio Ferdinand, Frank Lampard, Joe Cole, Michael Carrick and Glen Johnson began their careers at the club and all are playing for one of the "Big Four" clubs. Most recently the likes of first team midfield regulars Mark Noble and Jack Collison and younger stars Freddie Sears, Junior Stanislas, James Tomkins, Josh Payne, Jordan Spence and Zavon Hines have emerged through the Academy. Frustratingly, for the fans and managers alike, [ 70 ] the club has struggled to retain many of these players due to (predominantly) financial [ 71 ] reasons. West Ham, during the 2007–08 season, had an average of 6.61 English players in the starting line up, higher than any other Premier League club, [ 72 ] which cemented their status as one of the few Premier League clubs left that were recognised to be bringing through young English talent and were recognised as having 'homegrown players'. Between 2000 and 2011, the club produced eight England players, as many as Manchester United and one fewer than Arsenal. [ 73 ] Much of the success of The Academy has been attributed to Tony Carr who has been West Ham youth coach since 1973. [ 74 ]


Match Preview: West Ham v Chelsea

2nd May 1988 – with S-Express at number one with ‘Theme from S-Express’ and Wall Street in UK cinemas, West Ham United met Chelsea for the final game at Upton Park of the 1987/88 season in front of 28,521.

Prior to kick-off, Stewart Robson was named Hammer of the Year, with Billy Bonds runner-up. The Irons, needing a win to secure top flight survival, broke the deadlock in the 16th minute – Mark Ward found Leroy Rosenior (pictured) who swivelled and fired beyond Kevin Hitchcock from just inside the area. The pair were involved again for the second goal 20 minutes later, Ward producing excellent work in his own half before sending Rosenior clear with a delightful ball in behind the Chelsea rearguard, the striker slotting past Hitchcock to double the lead.

Hammers defender Paul Hilton scored the third on 57 minutes after Tony Dorigo had blocked Rosenior’s header following Tony Gale’s flick-on from a corner. Rosenior turned from hero to villain when he lashed out at future West Ham assistant manager Steve Clarke and was sent off. Substitute Colin West reduced the arrears for Chelsea from a corner but Tony Cottee restored the three-goal advantage, making it 4-1 with a late header from a Ward cross. Cottee would be the club’s top scorer in 1987/88 with 15 goals from 44 matches. The goals, and end-of-season presentations, can be viewed in my video below.

The Hammers would finish 16th in 1987/88 while Chelsea would finish 18th. Liverpool won the league title and Wimbledon won the FA Cup.

West Ham United: Tom McAlister, Steve Potts, Paul Hilton, Tony Gale, Julian Dicks, Mark Ward, Stewart Robson, Alan Dickens, George Parris, Leroy Rosenior, Tony Cottee.

Chelsea: Kevin Hitchcock, Gareth Hall, Steve Clarke, Steve Wicks, Tony Dorigo, John Bumstead, Micky Hazard (Colin West), Joe McLaughlin, Pat Nevin, Gordon Durie, Kerry Dixon.

Club Connections

A decent number of players have represented both West Ham United and Chelsea. Victor Moses spent the 2015/16 season on loan with the Hammers and has proved a key player in recent seasons for the Blues. Others to have worn the colours of both clubs include:

Goalkeepers: Craig Forrest and Harry Medhurst.

Defenders: Tal Ben Haim, Scott Minto, Wayne Bridge, Ian Pearce, Joe Kirkup, Glen Johnson and Jon Harley.

Midfielders: Bill Jackson, Frank Lampard Junior, Andy Malcolm, Syd Bishop, Peter Brabrook, Alan Dickens, George Horn, Eric Parsons, Robert Bush, Scott Parker, Yossi Benayoun, Joe Cole, Jim Frost and John Sissons.

Strikers: David Speedie, Len Goulden, Billy Bridgeman, Demba Ba, Joe Payne, Clive Allen, George Hilsdon, Carlton Cole, Billy Brown, Jimmy Greaves, Pop Robson, Billy Williams, Ron Tindall and Bob Deacon.

Gianfranco Zola played for Chelsea and managed West Ham, while Sir Geoff Hurst and Dave Sexton both played for the Hammers and managed the Blues. Bobby Gould played for West Ham and went on to be assistant and caretaker manager of Chelsea. Avram Grant has managed both clubs.

Today’s focus is on a former Chelsea defender who went on to manage West Ham United. Ron Greenwood was born on the 11th November 1921 in Worsthorne, Burnley but moved to London as a child during the 1930s Depression. He was educated at the Wembley County Grammar School, which now forms part of Alperton Community School in Middlesex, leaving at the age of 14 to become an apprentice sign-writer – a centre-half, Greenwood initially joined Chelsea as an amateur whilst serving his apprenticeship. He served with an RAF mobile radio unit in France during World War Two. Greenwood joined Bradford Park Avenue in 1945 and made 59 league appearances over the next four seasons. In 1949, he moved to the club he supported as a boy, Brentford, his £9,500 fee breaking the club’s incoming transfer record. He made 147 appearances and scored one goal. Greenwood was never capped for his country, though he did make a single ‘B’ team appearance for England whilst at Brentford, in a 1-0 victory in the Netherlands on 23rd March 1952.

The 30-year-old Greenwood joined Ted Drake’s Chelsea in October 1952. He made his debut in a 2-1 home win over Tottenham on 25th October 1952 and made 11 First Division appearances as Chelsea avoided relegation by one point. He played a bigger role in 1953/54, making 34 appearances in all competitions as the Blues improved to finish eighth in the top flight. Greenwood made 21 appearances as Chelsea won the First Division title in 1954/55, the first major trophy in their history. His final appearance for the club came on Christmas Day 1954 in a 1-0 defeat at Arsenal.

After 66 appearances for Chelsea in all competitions, the 33-year-old Greenwood moved to Fulham, where he made another 42 league appearances before retiring at the end of the 1955/56 season. At the end of his playing career in 1956, Greenwood became an active freemason attending the Lodge of Proven Fellowship No. 6225, but resigned in 1977.

After retiring Greenwood moved into coaching. He coached Eastbourne United in the Metropolitan League, Oxford University (where he came to the attention of Sir Harold Thompson, a future Chairman of the FA) and the England Youth and Under-23 teams. He combined the England Under-23 post with being the assistant manager at Arsenal under George Swindin, having moved to Highbury in December 1957. He remained there until April 1961, when he was selected by chairman Reg Pratt to replace Ted Fenton as manager of West Ham United. In his autobiography Yours Sincerely, Greenwood revealed how the appointment came about, starting when he was approached by Arsenal’s club secretary Bob Wall:

“’Mr Pratt, the West Ham chairman, has been on’, he said, ‘and he’s wondering if he can approach you with a view to you becoming their manager’. I told him I thought my future was with Arsenal and asked him if George Swindin knew about the offer. ’Well…. yes’ he replied, and then added: ‘You know, I think this job may be of interest to you’. He was painting a glowing picture of Mr Pratt and it was obvious he knew him well. I got the message loud and clear. ‘All right’ I said. ‘I’ll pop across to see him’. I drove across to West Ham on the Tuesday morning and met Reg Pratt and his vice-chairman, Len Cearns, members of two families who were West Ham. We talked in a little private room just off the old Upton Park Boardroom, and I must confess that when I sat down I did not have any firm notions about the job or the club. They came straight to the point and said they wanted me to become West Ham’s manager-coach. I was perfectly frank with them and said I was enjoying my job with Arsenal and the England Under-23 side, and that the decision facing me was a difficult one. ‘But if I do take the job’, I added, ‘I would want full control of all team matters and no interference’.”

Greenwood was offered an annual salary of £2,000, revealing he was ‘more interested in the possibilities of the job than the money’ and how he ‘started thinking about the many promising young West Ham players’ he had met. Greenwood steered the Hammers to a 16th-placed finish in 1960/61 after his first few weeks at the club. He signed Johnny ‘Budgie’ Byrne from Crystal Palace in March 1962 and handed a debut to Martin Peters a month later – immediate improvement was seen as the Hammers finished 1961/62 in eighth position. 1962/63 saw the Hammers drop to 12th but Greenword had switched Geoff Hurst to a central striking role a move which would pay long-term dividends.

The Irons finished 14th in 1963/64 but won the FA Cup for the first time in the club’s history, beating Manchester United in the semi-final at Hillsborough before defeating Preston 3-2 at Wembley. The Hammers climbed to ninth in the First Division in 1964/65 and beat TSV 1860 Munich to win the European Cup Winners’ Cup, in another Final staged at Wembley. West Ham finished 12th twice and 16th once in the following three seasons before rising to eighth in 1968/69. Greenwood sold Peters to Tottenham in 1969/70 and the Hammers finished 17th. The club finished 20th, one place above the relegation places in 1970/71 but finished 14th the following year. Greenwood claimed his highest league placing in 1972/73 as West Ham finished sixth, inspired by the goalscoring exploits of Bryan ‘Pop’ Robson.

The Hammers dropped dramatically the following season, finishing 18th. Greenwood took the decision to become General Manager of the club, with assistant John Lyall taking over. My video below tells the story of Ron Greenwood’s time as manager at West Ham United, in his own words, taking in Wembley wins in the FA Cup (1964) and the European Cup Winners’ Cup (1965) to his thoughts on key players such as Billy Bonds, Sir Trevor Brooking and Bryan ‘Pop’ Robson, as well as his replacement John Lyall.

Greenwood remained at the club until 1977 when he replaced Don Revie as England manager. The Three Lions had not qualified for a major tournament for ten years when Greenwood led his country to Euro 1980 and then the 1982 World Cup. England did not lose a game in Spain but could not progress beyond the second group stage. Greenwood retired from football after the World Cup and went on to be a regular analyst on BBC Radio. Ron Greenwood died on 9th February 2006, aged 84, after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s disease.

Sunday’s referee will be Mike Dean 2018/19 is Dean’s 19th as a Premier League referee. Since West Ham United achieved promotion back to the top flight in 2012 Dean has refereed 21 of our league matches, officiating in nine wins for the Hammers, six draws and six defeats.

Dean refereed our final match at the Boleyn when we famously triumphed 3-2 over Manchester United. His decision to send off Sofiane Feghouli just 15 minutes into our 2-0 defeat to the Red Devils in January 2017 was later rescinded. Dean’s three Hammers appointments last season were the 3-2 win over Tottenham in the League Cup fourth round at Wembley in October, the 2-1 defeat at Manchester City in December and, most recently, our 1-1 Premier League draw with Tottenham in January.

Possible line-ups

West Ham United are without Winston Reid, Jack Wilshere, Manuel Lanzini, Chicharito and Andy Carroll, while Marko Arnautovic is a doubt. West Ham are seeking consecutive Premier League wins for the first time since January 2017. The Hammers have won three of their last four home games against Chelsea in all competitions.

Chelsea manager Maurizio Sarri will be without Marco van Ginkel, while left-back Emerson is a doubt. Mateo Kovacic and Pedro are both likely to be available. Jorginho has attempted 505 passes and completed 461, the most in the top flight this season prior to the weekend matches.

Possible West Ham United XI: Fabianski Zabaleta, Balbuena, Diop, Masuaku Rice, Obiang, Noble Yarmolenko, Anderson Perez.

Possible Chelsea XI: Kepa Azpilicueta, Rudiger, Luiz, Alonso Jorginho, Kante, Kovacic Pedro, Giroud, Hazard.


West Ham United under Gianfranco Zola

2008-Present

Despite a very shacky start under Zolas reign, the Hammers were able to finish comfortably midtable in his first season with the club. Although from the outset, Zola had already got a number of factors going against him unlike previous managers at the club. West Ham as a whole were close to financial ruin due to crash of formal sponsor XL.com and the Icelantic banks. Not to mention shabby dealings in the market with massive wages for injury prone players (Kieron Dyer).

Zola faced many difficulties when it came to try and strengthen his already injury prone squad. Dean Ashton looked set to retire from the game, Craig Bellamy was not replaced and "new star" Savio was sent packing after several poor outings. This left Zola at the start of his first full season in charge with only Carlton Cole as his only experienced and tested option in attack. Help from Sponsors SBOBET allowed the club to fund the transfer of attacking option Diamanti whilst it was claimed Scott Duxbury funded himself, along with Nani, the deal to bring in Franco to make sure the Hammers had something for the new season.

Despite a good start against newly promoted Wolves (2 v 0 away win), the club went on to struggle badly in the first 12 games, picking up just 1 more win and finding themselves in the relegation mix around November 2009.

News of a possible takeover to save the Hammers was announced at the end of October, with an American group made up of West Ham fans ready to launch a £100 million bid whilst former Birmingham co owner Gold (West Ham fan and previous share holder of club) also announced he would to be interested in taking control of the East London outfit with a rumoured bid of around £80million being offered.

Come December 2009, no takeover had happened, and the current owners held creditors meetings to try and get the banks to give them more time to raise vital funds. Results on the pitch improved slightly with November finishing with 2 wins, 1 draw and a defeat, but Zola's men were given a swift reminder of the up hill battle they faced to survive at the hands of Manchester United, as they lost 4 v 0 at home, many were beginning to doubt Zola's abilities, even comparing him to former boss Glenn Roeder. More bad luck followed with the loss of top goal scorer Carlton Cole for 2 months to injury along with young Zavon Hines with a knee injury leaving Zola over the Christmas break with just Franco and Nouble up front. West Ham also lost Behrami for most of December along with facing a scare with Goalkeeper Robert Green who went off early during the Manchester United game. This since proved to be just down to illness rather than injury.

List of site sources >>>


Watch the video: Γουέστ Χαμ - Μάντσεστερ Γιουνάιτεντ 3-2 (January 2022).